Ways to get involved in Unlock

We’ve published an updated briefing on reforming the criminal records disclosure regime and we want to hear from you if you have a conviction that can never become spent. The Rehabilitation of Offenders Act (ROA) means that most convictions can become spent after a period of years. Changes implemented in 2014 (through focused mainly on
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As part of our fair access to employment project, we are gathering evidence of employers’ approaches to people with criminal records. We work with employers to develop fair policies and practices and highlight good practice. Ban the box is a key part of helping people with convictions get back into the workplace, and we have
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As a small charity rooted in the experiences of people with a criminal record, it’s really important that our work is shaped by the needs of the people that we exist to help. We are developing our plans for Unlock’s work in the next few years. We want to make sure that they reflect what
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In the 1960s, when Richard was 16, he was found in possession of a small amount of cannabis. He was prosecuted for possession and given a one-year conditional discharge. As a student a few years later, Richard got into trouble again and was convicted of taking an item of food from a warehouse where he
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Together with the charity Transform Justice, Unlock has launched the #FairChecks movement to help push for a fresh start for the criminal records system. Our outdated criminal records regime is holding hundreds of thousands of people back from participating fully in society. Even a minor criminal history can produce lifelong barriers to employment, volunteering, housing
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Update – The request for participants is now closed. See the message below from Nicola, the researcher: “Thank you to everyone who has been in contact with me with their generous offer to take part in my PhD research. I have been overwhelmed with responses and now have enough participants that fit the criteria, so
We have recently undertaken an important legal effort to intervene in a Supreme Court case which is due to be heard next month and which challenges the government’s approach to disclosing old and minor criminal records on standard and enhanced DBS checks. The government is arguing that the current criminal records disclosure regime is fair.
In the last year, our Information Hub website was used over 1.3 million times and we received feedback saying: “Totally anonymous way of accessing important information in relation to a spent conviction and disclosure. Extremely helpful and reassuring. Sincere thanks.”   “Your site has made it clear to me what the law is… and how
The Charities (Protection and Social Investment) Act 2016 means people with unspent convictions for specific offences, as well as those on the sex offenders register are automatically disqualified from acting as trustees or senior managers. As a charity that exists to support the efforts of people with convictions in moving on positively with their lives,
As part of the Justice Committee’s inquiry into the disclosure of youth criminal records, we’re taking a small group of people to Westminster to share their personal stories with MP’s on the Committee. It’s a really good opportunity to make sure that the Committee hears from people with personal experience of living with a criminal
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We’re pleased that, after joint efforts by Unlock and the Standing Committee for Youth Justice (SCYJ), the Justice Committee has launched a short inquiry into the system governing the disclosure of criminal records in relation to offences committed by people when under 18 years old. Given the Committee’s recent inquiry into young adults in the
The House of Commons Work and Pensions Select Committee have launched an inquiry into the benefits and employment support available to people with convictions when they leave prison. They are interested in hearing from anybody who has had experience of the prison system. The deadline for consultation is 15th July 2016. Find out how to