At the age of 16, Kate took the decision to move out of her family home and began renting a room from somebody she’d met through a friend. After she’d been there for three months and, without any warning, she returned home from college to find that her landlady had thrown the majority of her

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Larry only became aware that he had two offences on his record when he reached the age of 60 and needed an enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service check to volunteer with his son’s choir. When he was 16, Larry was convicted of possession of marijuana and received a one year conditional discharge. He wasn’t a

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The charity nia has this week published I’m no criminal – a report that examines the impact of prostitution-specific criminal records on women seeking to exit prostitution. The report shows that the constant disclosure of these criminal records has led to discrimination and harassment and entrenched them in prostitution and the criminal justice system through

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The latest blog by Christopher Stacey looks at whether the supermarket in EastEnders broke the law in doing a DBS on Derek? And why did a historic decriminalised offence show up on his disclosure? Read it here.

Lord Ramsbotham’s Private Members’ Bill on amending the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 has today had its First Reading in the House of Lords. The Bill, which would shorten the rehabilitation periods that apply under the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 (ROA), proposes a number of changes. One of the most significant elements is that

Press release: 3rd May 2017 Ruling gives hope to thousands of people trying to put their past behind them The Court of Appeal has today rejected the Government’s appeal to a decision of the High Court in January last year, which ruled that the criminal records disclosure scheme was disproportionate and unlawful. The judgment, handed down today, involves

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Earlier today our co-director, Christopher Stacey, gave evidence to the Justice Committee’s inquiry into the disclosure of youth criminal records. You can watch the session here or below.   More information Posts about our work on youth criminal records can be found here. The specific details of the inquiry are here There are more general

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As part of our Fair Access to Employment project we’re looking for examples of employers who have carried out inappropriate levels of criminal record checks.  We’re gathering this information to feed into our legal strategy which aims to put an end to unlawful criminal record checks. We’re especially keen to hear from anyone who believes

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Today the Economist has published an excellent piece, making the point that “the long memory of the law may limit the chance of rehabilitation”. Following the recent Law Commission report, and ahead of the Court of Appeal hearing into the current DBS filtering legal challenge, the article highlights Britain’s punitive approach to criminal records. Featuring the

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In a detailed report published today, the Law Commission has recommended a wider review of the criminal record disclosure system. In the most comprehensive operational assessment of the DBS filtering process to date, their conclusion is that: “Given the vast array and magnitude of the problems identified by our provisional assessment of the disclosure system

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Lord Ramsbotham’s Private Members’ Bill on amending the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 has today had its Second Reading in the House of Lords. The Bill, which would shorten the rehabilitation periods that apply under the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 (ROA), proposes a number of changes. One of the most significant elements is that

“A reformed criminal records system for children” That’s the recommendation of Charlie Taylor, whose review into youth justice was published today. In a wide-ranging review, there’s a specific section on criminal records (pages 25 and 26).   He proposes that the Ministry of Justice and the Home Office should: “Develop a distinct approach to how childhood offending

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