The Charity Commission has refused more than half of the applications it has received from people with criminal convictions who wish to serve as trustees or senior managers, prompting Unlock to call for a review. In an article published on the Civil Society website, Christopher Stacey, co-director of Unlock, said he was concerned about the

Together with the charity Transform Justice, Unlock has launched the #FairChecks movement to help push for a fresh start for the criminal records system. In this programme, Woman’s Hour’s Jenni Murray, talks to two women who have experienced problems with having to disclose their criminal records and to Unlock’s Policy & Practice Lead, Rachel Tynan.

We’ve just published our update for January 2020. This months update includes:   A new ‘Do I need to disclose my criminal record?’ tool which aims to help individuals work out whether they need to disclose their criminal record . A personal story from an individual reflecting on their experiences since their conviction ten years

Supreme Court ruled one year ago that disclosure and barring service rules breach rights DBS system continues to unlawfully breach rights of people with multiple minor convictions and childhood cautions. A year after the UK’s highest court found current rules on criminal records checks breach human rights laws, Unlock, Liberty and Just for Kids Law

“Do I need to tell them about my criminal record?” That’s one of the most common questions that our helpline receives when people are applying for work or volunteering roles. But it’s not a question that has a straightforward answer. The starting point is: You only have to disclose if you’re asked” But then it

Criminal records can be a barrier to moving on in life in many ways and we often hear from people who have been rejected from university because of their past convictions, or who are put off applying for fear of rejection. Unlocking students with conviction, a year long project run by Unlock and supported by

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In the 1960s, when Richard was 16, he was found in possession of a small amount of cannabis. He was prosecuted for possession and given a one-year conditional discharge. As a student a few years later, Richard got into trouble again and was convicted of taking an item of food from a warehouse where he

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Together with the charity Transform Justice, Unlock has launched the #FairChecks movement to help push for a fresh start for the criminal records system. Our outdated criminal records regime is holding hundreds of thousands of people back from participating fully in society. Even a minor criminal history can produce lifelong barriers to employment, volunteering, housing

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Looking back over the last couple of months, we’ve written up a few examples of the people we’ve helped. We hope they give a good idea of how we help people. However, more importantly than our role, we think that these examples show how people with convictions are able to overcome some of the barriers

Our helpline was contacted by a lady who was extremely concerned about a form her daughter had received following her university application. The lady explained that her daughter had applied for a teacher training degree and had been asked to confirm that nobody she lived with had any unspent convictions which would mean that she

Harold recently contacted our helpline for some advice after his local council refused him a taxi licence due to the non-disclosure of his historic convictions. He explained that as his convictions were from 30 years ago, he’d assumed that they were spent and therefore didn’t need to be disclosed. Immediately he became aware that his

Sheila contacted our helpline for some advice after she’d booked a family holiday to America. Sheila explained that after completing the Electronic System for Travel Authorisation (ESTA) form which had been approved, she started to worry that she should have disclosed her husband’s criminal record from 2011. Stories she’d read online seemed to suggest that

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