Looking back over the last couple of months, we’ve written up a few examples of the people we’ve helped. We hope they give a good idea of how we help people. However, more importantly than our role, we think that these examples show how people with convictions are able to overcome some of the barriers

Our helpline was recently contacted by an individual who wanted to highlight a question being asked about criminal records by a professional body on their application form. The individual believed that this question was potentially very misleading as it asked: “Have you ever received a caution or conviction for a criminal record?” We informed the

Katie contacted our helpline for some advice around employment after she’d been cautioned by the police for common assault after ‘slapping’ her 7-year old son Jake. Katie explained that this incident had been completely out of character but Jake’s behaviour whilst out having a family meal had been terrible and had included him hitting and

Hilary contacted our helpline following an issue that her son Jack was having with his Public Protection Unit officer (PPU). Hilary explained that Jack had been convicted of a sexting offence in 2017 which resulted in him being put on the Sex Offenders Register and receiving a Sexual Harm Prevention Order (SHPO). Since his conviction

Gerry contacted our helpline for some advice around employment and, in particular, the pressure he was being put under by the police and probation to disclose his conviction to his employer, even though his employers had never asked him to disclose. Gerry explained that he’d been convicted of a sexual offence and although he’d never

Alan contacted our helpline after he’d received a letter from his local council following an application to go onto their housing register. The council had written to Alan asking him to provide proof of his convictions and stating that they would accept his Subject Access Request (SAR) as evidence. We advised him that requesting a

In early 2018, Kabir was offered a job working as a Sales Consultant for an IT company based in Wales. As part of the terms and conditions of his employment, Kabir was told that he would need a basic criminal record check which would be carried out by a DBS Responsible Organisation (RO). Although Kabir

Looking back over the last couple of months, we’ve written up a few examples of the people we’ve helped. We hope they give a good idea of how we help people. However, more importantly than our role, we think that these examples show how people with convictions are able to overcome some of the barriers

Will started a thread on theForum when he wanted information about opening a bank account with a fraud conviction. Following his conviction, Will had set up an online shop which had become quite successful and although he had run his company through his personal bank account, he wanted to open a business account. He’d applied

Shortly after joining theForum, Adam started a thread asking how other members coped with their emotions. He stated that one day he’d be fine and felt able to cope with anything life threw at him, and the next he’d be extremely depressed having realised that, as a person with a conviction, he was unemployable. Several

When he was aged 18, Nathan received a three year custodial sentence for GBH. Twenty three years later, having put his past conviction behind him, Nathan was offered a job as a court usher. He knew that he’d need a criminal record check and was surprised that after working for 5 months, he’d still not

Dan thought he had a good understanding of criminal records. He also felt that more and more employers had started to ask about criminal records which had made it harder for him to secure a job. Although his conviction was very old, Dan was also registered disabled. His disability didn’t prevent him from working, but

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