Looking back over the last couple of months, we’ve written up a few examples of the people we’ve helped. We hope they give a good idea of how we help people. However, more importantly than our role, we think that these examples show how people with convictions are able to overcome some of the barriers

After working for a bank for several years, Felix had applied for a new role as a mortgage broker. The bank had carried out a basic DBS check when Felix was initially employed but, as his convictions were spent, nothing was disclosed on his certificate. However, he had recently discovered that his new role would

Caleb contacted our helpline as he was concerned that a recruitment agency were going to carry out an ineligible criminal record check. Caleb explained that he had a spent conviction for criminal damage from 2016. He’d always been very embarrassed about it and found it difficult to talk about and, it was for this reason

Wes contacted our helpline for some advice as he was concerned about how much access he should give a potential employer to his criminal record. Wes explained that he’d applied for a job as a university lecturer following an approach by the Head of Faculty. He knew that as his role would bring him into

Thea contacted our helpline for some advice in completing a university application form. Thea explained that she had two old cautions which were eligible for filtering (and so would not appear on her enhanced DBS certificate). However, the wording of the university’s statement and question on their application form implied that she needed to disclose

Our helpline was contacted recently by an individual who had some concerns about the questions being asked relating to criminal records on a homeless accommodation provider’s job application form. The individual had been applying to be an administrative assistant and, having seen the job description, assumed that the role would be eligible for a basic

Lawrence contacted us concerned that a crown court had provided information about his spent conviction without the proper authority. Lawrence had a spent conviction from 12 years ago which could still be found on the internet. His local residents’ association had used the information they found online to request a Certificate of Conviction from the

Looking back over the last couple of months, we’ve written up a few examples of the people we’ve helped. We hope they give a good idea of how we help people. However, more importantly than our role, we think that these examples show how people with convictions are able to overcome some of the barriers

Our helpline was contacted by a lady who was extremely concerned about a form her daughter had received following her university application. The lady explained that her daughter had applied for a teacher training degree and had been asked to confirm that nobody she lived with had any unspent convictions which would mean that she

Harold recently contacted our helpline for some advice after his local council refused him a taxi licence due to the non-disclosure of his historic convictions. He explained that as his convictions were from 30 years ago, he’d assumed that they were spent and therefore didn’t need to be disclosed. Immediately he became aware that his

Sheila contacted our helpline for some advice after she’d booked a family holiday to America. Sheila explained that after completing the Electronic System for Travel Authorisation (ESTA) form which had been approved, she started to worry that she should have disclosed her husband’s criminal record from 2011. Stories she’d read online seemed to suggest that

Toni recently contacted our helpline for some advice around what she needed to disclose when applying for a job as a teaching assistant in a school. One of her main problems was that she was unsure of the exact details of her conviction. We advised Toni to apply for a subject access request (SAR) from

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