Unlock speaks to Paul Lewis of Radio 4 Money Box on how insurers are breaking the law by taking into account old criminal records, disadvantaging millions of people with spent convictions. You can listen to the programme here

Tagged under:

The Lammy Review

Tuesday, 12 September 2017 by

Christopher Stacey speaks to Radio Kent on the report by David Lammy MP and it’s recommendations for reform to the criminal records disclosure regime. Unlock has also commented on David Lammy’s report in the following publications since it was published. CIPD Personnel Today The Express The Independent  

An article in the Independent reports that families of offenders face higher premiums and even flat refusals when it comes to getting insurance. The article quotes a report by Unlock, which revealed that 37 per cent of the calls made to its helpline related to insurance. It also revealed a startling issue; that many families of prisoners and

Tagged under: ,

The Court of Appeal has rejected the Government’s appeal to a decision of the High Court, which ruled that the criminal records disclosure scheme was disproportionate and unlawful. Reporting on the news, The Law Society Gazette said that the government will have to go back to the drawing board. In the article, Christopher Stacey of Unlock explained that the charity is contacted

Tagged under: ,

Around 50% of offenders re-offend within a year. Lack of money for basic necessities can increase the risk of re-offending. The first few weeks after release from prison are critical. Many prisons offer some sort of basic financial advice to help ex-offenders navigate life on the outside but recent changes mean provision can be patchy.

Tagged under:

Christopher Stacey talks to  Three Counties Radio  on whether employers should be discouraged from asking about convictions at the  application stage.  This would give  applicants  the chance to be judged on their skills and abilities first and give them the opportunity to disclose their convictions, in person, at a later stage of the application process.

Tagged under: , ,

Today the Economist has published an excellent piece, making the point that “the long memory of the law may limit the chance of rehabilitation”. Following the recent Law Commission report, and ahead of the Court of Appeal hearing into the current DBS filtering legal challenge, the article highlights Britain’s punitive approach to criminal records. Featuring the

Tagged under:

An article published  by Nat West suggests that one  remedy to fill the UK’s skills gap could be to hire more ex-offenders and discusses what is the best way to go about it. Christopher Stacey, co-director of Unlock, contributes to the article, stating “We know from employers that have been proactive in recruiting people with convictions that they make good employees.

Later this year, the automatic disqualification rules will be extended to cover even more criminal convictions. The new laws will automatically disqualify people with a wide range of criminal convictions from being charity trustees or senior managers. Those affected will have to resign or apply to the Charity Commission for waivers. In this Third Sector

              Christopher Stacey speaks to Three Counties Radio on why employers should be more open to employing people with convictions (Available until 14th January 2017)

Tagged under: ,

                Unlock has spoken to BBC South East Today (no longer available online) Radio 5 live (available until 20th Oct) and Radio Kent (available until 21st) about the discrimination by employers towards people with convictions and how employers are missing out on a pool of talent by asking about an applicants criminal record on

Tagged under: , ,

              Christopher Stacey speaks to BBC Three Counties Radio about the reporting of convictions online, the effect it can have and why people with convictions change their name. You can listen to the programme here  (available until 19 September 2016)    

TOP
We use cookies on this website to help us improve it.
Find out more about how we use cookies.
OK