Unlock, a leading independent charity for people with convictions, has today published guidance to help charities, as well as those involved in them, understand and prepare for changes to charity rules and its impact on people with criminal records. From 1st August 2018, changes to the ‘automatic disqualification’ rules mean that there will be more

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We’ve just published our update for January 2018.             This months update includes: Some new information on the introduction of basic criminal record checks by the Disclosure and Barring Service. A personal story from a gentleman who trained to become a barber whilst in prison who’s gone on to provide

  We are actively recruiting Trustees to join the Board at Unlock Unlock is an independent award-winning charity that provides a voice and support for people with convictions who are facing stigma and obstacles because of their criminal record. We are an innovative, creative and award winning social action charity, seeking people with the appropriate

              Unlock is delighted to publish the Unlock Annual Report 2016/2017 which describes our impact including: feedback from people we have helped: “changed my life actually“, “you have given me hope“, “you are making a very positive contribution to the goal of rehabilitating offenders“ dealing with 6569 enquiries to our helpline

From today, the 17th January 2018, basic criminal record checks can now be obtained directly from the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) This is a significant development for both people with criminal records and employers in England & Wales. Basic checks are a type of criminal record check that can be used by employers and

Changes to the ‘automatic disqualification’ rules that affect who can run a charity, and particularly people with criminal records, will come into force on 1st August 2018. The current rules only apply to trustees. People with unspent convictions for certain offences, including dishonesty and deception offences, need to be granted a waiver from the Charity

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Looking back over the last couple of months, we’ve written up a few examples of the people we’ve helped. We hope they give a good idea of how we help people. However, more importantly than our role, we think that these examples show how people with convictions are able to overcome some of the barriers

Today we’ve published our winter 2017/18 newsletter. The newsletter provides an update of the news at Unlock in the last three months. It’s sent to everyone who’s on our public mailing list, and we hope it’s a useful way of keeping up to date with what we’ve been up to. Read: Winter 2017/18 Newsletter  Previous newsletters

We’ve just published our update for December 2017.             This months update includes: An advice post which sets out the new discretionary powers given to the police by the Home Office for dealing with ‘sexting’ offences. A personal story in which an individual with a criminal record tells how he

With the Christmas break almost upon us and 2017 coming to an end, it’s a good time to reflect on the last 12 months work of the charity and the developments relating to criminal records. Once again it’s been an incredibly busy year for Unlock, with lots of positive news and progress to report. We’ve

With the disclosure of old and irrelevant criminal records in the spotlight, Christopher Stacey looks at how the system is unfairly holding people back Over four million jobs every year involve employers requesting an enhanced criminal record from the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS). Although these were originally for roles that involve close contact with

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Three-quarters of a million criminal records that are more than a decade old are being revealed to employers on DBS checks each year. That’s one of the findings of a new briefing published by the Centre for Criminal and Justice Studies (CCJS). The research, which we have supported, was featured in The Observer on Sunday

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