With the disclosure of old and irrelevant criminal records in the spotlight, Christopher Stacey looks at how the system is unfairly holding people back Over four million jobs every year involve employers requesting an enhanced criminal record from the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS). Although these were originally for roles that involve close contact with

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The Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) is introducing basic criminal record checks for people in England & Wales. This replaces the service previously provided by Disclosure Scotland. This is a significant development for both people with criminal records and employers in England & Wales, so we’ve developed a new information page dedicated to basic DBS checks as

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An article published  by Nat West suggests that one  remedy to fill the UK’s skills gap could be to hire more ex-offenders and discusses what is the best way to go about it. Christopher Stacey, co-director of Unlock, contributes to the article, stating “We know from employers that have been proactive in recruiting people with convictions that they make good employees.

Published by the Department for Work and Pensions in partnership with Business in the Community, the guide, Strengthening your workforce with talent from disadvantaged groups, comes after high demand from the business world for more help and support for employers to become inclusive. Part of the See Potential campaign, it’s already been welcomed by the

We’re pleased to see that the Prisons Minister, Sam Gyimah, is developing an employment strategy and exploring ways to increase the number of employers giving opportunities to people with convictions. We’re keen to ensure that the strategy is informed by both people with convictions and employers, so we’ve written details about the opportunities for you

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Unlock, the country’s leading charity for people with convictions, today launches a unique website to encourage and support companies to recruit people with criminal records. Over 10.5 million people in the UK have a criminal record and many face stigma and discrimination when applying for work, despite having put the past behind them. Unlock’s work

As the development of our website for employers continues, we’ll no longer be posting news specifically for employers on the main Unlock website. Instead, we’ll be posting directly onto the news section Recruit!, our website for employers. You can continue to find the news about our Fair Access to Employment project on this site, and there will

Today, we’re pleased to be releasing a Beta version of Recruit!, our new website for employers. With the strapline “supporting the fair treatment of people with criminal records”, Recruit! is website that supports employers to recruit people with convictions and deal with criminal records fairly. The aims of the site are to: Promote good recruitment

As part of our employment project, we’ve produced some short stories based on the experiences of people with convictions finding work. Each of the stories show something different, as we explain below. However, although every situation is unique, we think that the stories serve as a helpful way or showing the importance of supporting employers

Two years on since the launch of the Ban the Box campaign, Business in the Community (BITC), who lead the campaign, have marked the anniversary by launching a free step-by-step guide to creating a fair recruitment process in dealing with criminal records. We’ve endorsed the campaign since it launched in October 2013 in response to

At Unlock, we like to think of ourselves as making good use of social media as an effective way of communicating with a range of groups of people. Yet, if we’re being honest, although we try and make regular use of Twitter and Facebook, we’ve probably neglected the role of LinkedIn, and how it might

As part of this project, we’re promoting ‘Fair Chance Hiring’ policies in our approach to employers. ‘Fair Chance Hiring’ originates from the United States and has ‘Ban the Box’ at the heart of changes in the recruitment practice of employers. One of the first steps is to develop a set of high-level principles for putting ‘Fair

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