On Wednesday 30th January at 9.45am, the Supreme Court will hand down its judgement in the case of R (on the application of P, G and W) and R (on the application of P) v Secretary of State for the Home Department and others. The criminal records disclosure scheme has twice been ruled unlawful –

Today we’ve published our winter 2018/19 newsletter. The newsletter provides an update of the news at Unlock in the last three months. It’s sent to everyone who’s on our public mailing list, and we hope it’s a useful way of keeping up to date with what we’ve been up to. Read: Winter 2018/19 Newsletter  Previous newsletters

The latest blog by Christopher Stacey looks at the news this week that a council has sacked a woman with a criminal record that is nearly two decades old because she they say she is a substantial risk to their reputation. Read it here.

With the Christmas break almost upon us and 2018 coming to an end, it’s a good time to reflect on the last 12 months and the developments relating to criminal records. Once again it’s been an incredibly busy year for Unlock, with lots of positive news and progress to report in terms of the charity

The problem of spent convictions appearing online is a real and significant problem for many people. Two individuals with spent convictions brought claims against Google for refusing to de-list search engine results that contained details of their now spent convictions. The cases, the first in the UK on the so-called ‘right to be forgotten’, had

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A criminal record can be a real obstacle in getting on in life. But what we don’t know is if people from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) groups face additional barriers that white people don’t. Unlock is an independent charity for people with criminal records. We’re collecting evidence that will help us to better

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Today we’ve published our autumn 2018 newsletter. The newsletter provides an update of the news at Unlock in the last three months. It’s sent to everyone who’s on our public mailing list, and we hope it’s a useful way of keeping up to date with what we’ve been up to. Read: Autumn 2018 Newsletter  Previous newsletters

The current criminal record disclosure rules are unnecessarily harsh and disproportionate – they mean that standard and enhanced DBS checks continue to disclose old, minor and irrelevant offences that often happened decades ago. This means people can feel like they are effectively serving a life sentence for minor offences that they committed in their youth.

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Today we have submitted our written response to the government’s call for evidence on the employment for people with convictions. Download our submission here. You can find out more about the call for evidence in our recent post to encourage others to get involved. Our submission draws on work that we’ve been doing as part

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The Cabinet Office (in partnership with the Ministry of Justice) are calling for evidence on the employment for people with convictions, and they want to hear from employers about recruitment practices, employability initiatives and evidence/impact. As well as employers, the Cabinet Office want to hear from organisations or professionals who: work with people with convictions

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There are over 11 million people in this country with a criminal record. Many of them play a vital role in contributing to the work of charities. There are many charities, including those working with people in the criminal justice system, that are ‘user led’ or actively involve their beneficiaries at a senior level in

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We are delighted to announce the appointment of Rachel Tynan, who has joined Unlock as our new policy and practice lead. Rachel has previously worked in the civil service and higher education and joins us following the completion of her PhD and a stint at Open Book at Goldsmiths. Rachel will be leading Unlock’s work

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