The Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) is introducing basic criminal record checks for people in England & Wales. This replaces the service previously provided by Disclosure Scotland. This is a significant development for both people with criminal records and employers in England & Wales, so we’ve developed a new information page dedicated to basic DBS checks as

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The charity nia has this week published I’m no criminal – a report that examines the impact of prostitution-specific criminal records on women seeking to exit prostitution. The report shows that the constant disclosure of these criminal records has led to discrimination and harassment and entrenched them in prostitution and the criminal justice system through

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The latest blog by Christopher Stacey looks at whether the supermarket in EastEnders broke the law in doing a DBS on Derek? And why did a historic decriminalised offence show up on his disclosure? Read it here.

Today we’ve published our summer 2017 newsletter. The newsletter provides an update of the news at Unlock in the last three months. It’s sent to everyone who’s on our public mailing list, and we hope it’s a useful way of keeping up to date with what we’ve been up to. Read: Summer 2017 Newsletter  Previous newsletters

We’re looking for help in creating a number of original eye-catching photos, graphics and other images to help us to promote our work around criminal records and disclosure. Given the sensitivity of identifying specific individuals, we’re keen to involve some creative thinking in this process. So although we want to look at ways of involving

Lord Ramsbotham’s Private Members’ Bill on amending the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 has today had its First Reading in the House of Lords. The Bill, which would shorten the rehabilitation periods that apply under the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 (ROA), proposes a number of changes. One of the most significant elements is that

‘Through the gate’ services are failing to support people into employment. That’s one of the conclusions in a report published last week by HM Inspectorate of Probation and HM Inspectorate of Prisons into the ‘through the gate resettlement services’ that were introduced in 2015 and run by newly formed ‘Community Rehabilitation Companies’ (CRCs). Right from

A criminal record at whatever age can be a real obstacle in getting on in life. But are there specific barriers that people face because of a criminal record that they got as a young adult? In the last couple of years, we’ve worked closely with the Standing Committee for Youth Justice to look at

The Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 provides people with criminal records protection from discrimination once their criminal record becomes ‘spent’. In an article for the Probation Journal, published this month, Christopher Stacey highlights how media reports are increasingly available online and often mean spent convictions continue to be accessible to employers and others. However, he

The Conservative Party has included a commitment in their 2017 manifesto that aims to encourage and support employers to take on people with convictions. It states: “We will also work to help those groups who have in the past found it difficult to get employment, by incentivising employers to take them on. So for businesses

People with criminal records – An untapped talent pool that has been ignored for too long There are over 10.5 million people in England & Wales with a criminal record, and many find themselves treated unfairly and unnecessarily held back in life because of their past. Government has a role to play in finding solutions.

Press release: 3rd May 2017 Ruling gives hope to thousands of people trying to put their past behind them The Court of Appeal has today rejected the Government’s appeal to a decision of the High Court in January last year, which ruled that the criminal records disclosure scheme was disproportionate and unlawful. The judgment, handed down today, involves

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