#FairChecks movement

Our outdated criminal records regime is holding hundreds of thousands of people back from participating fully in society. Even a minor criminal history can produce lifelong barriers to employment, volunteering, housing and even travelling abroad, many years after people have moved on from their past. The system needs to change. The #FairChecks movement is calling

We were contacted by an individual after she’d been dismissed from her job as a receptionist with a Community Rehabilitation Company (CRC). When she’d applied for the job, she was aware that she’d need a basic DBS check and, as her conviction was spent, she didn’t disclose it to the employer. However, after starting the

Published by the Department for Work and Pensions in partnership with Business in the Community, the guide, Strengthening your workforce with talent from disadvantaged groups, comes after high demand from the business world for more help and support for employers to become inclusive. Part of the See Potential campaign, it’s already been welcomed by the

Two years on since the launch of the Ban the Box campaign, Business in the Community (BITC), who lead the campaign, have marked the anniversary by launching a free step-by-step guide to creating a fair recruitment process in dealing with criminal records. We’ve endorsed the campaign since it launched in October 2013 in response to

As part of this project, we’re promoting ‘Fair Chance Hiring’ policies in our approach to employers. ‘Fair Chance Hiring’ originates from the United States and has ‘Ban the Box’ at the heart of changes in the recruitment practice of employers. One of the first steps is to develop a set of high-level principles for putting ‘Fair

Approach to employers

Background In 2015 Unlock started a project, supported by the Esmée Fairbairn Foundation, focused on fair access to employment for people with convictions. A key part of this work is supporting employers to develop and implement fair and inclusive policies and procedures that enable the recruitment of people with criminal records.   Why is this

With the Christmas break almost upon us and 2017 coming to an end, it’s a good time to reflect on the last 12 months work of the charity and the developments relating to criminal records. Once again it’s been an incredibly busy year for Unlock, with lots of positive news and progress to report. We’ve

The leading charity for people with convictions has welcomed a report published today by the Work and Pensions Committee which calls on government to drastically improve the support provided to people released from prison and do more to encourage employers to recruit people with convictions. Christopher Stacey, Co-director of Unlock, said: “Today’s report shows that

There’s a talent pool of over 10.5 million people that many companies are overlooking. People with criminal records make good employees. This new website that we’re launching today helps employers to make sure they’re not missing out on the diverse skills and experience of people with criminal records. With over 750,000 unfilled job vacancies in

What is ban the box? Far too often we hear from people who are unable to get past the application part of a recruitment process simply because they have to tick ‘yes’ to the question about convictions. Ban the Box is a campaign to increase opportunities for people with convictions to compete for jobs. We’re

Unlock welcomes the Chancellor’s summer statement, in particular, incentivising employers to create training placements and apprenticeships for young adults. This age group has been significantly affected by the impact of the coronavirus pandemic – by mid-June, around a third of 18-24 year olds had been furloughed or made redundant. The ‘Kickstart’ scheme means 16-24 year

Introduction This page brings together the difficulties faced by people with criminal records (PWCRs) as a result of Covid-19 and social distancing measures. We’ll keep this page under review as we learn more about the issues people are facing. We ran a survey from May to June 2020 to find out how people were being